Piano Trio
Review of London Recitals, London, England
Making their London debut before embarking on a European tour the International Trio – aptly named since American, Romanian and German players are involved – immediately impressed by the quality and polish of their music-making. The technical foundations are unquestioned: perfect intonation, precise ensemble and exact rhythm informs all that they did, but more than that, there was complete accord in their interpretive ideas and a confident approach in their expression.

Mendelssohn Violin Concerto
Waterloo Courier, Waterloo, Iowa
The group’s opening concert featured the Mendelssohn’s Concerto for Violin and Orchestra in E Minor, Opus 64. One of the more difficult pieces for violin, the concerto proved to be a perfect vehicle for Beluska’s technical prowess and ability for interpretation. The work is at once happy and energetic, and nervelessly vibrant, and Beluska was well-deserving of the standing ovation he received.

Piano Trio
Music and Musicians Magazine, London, England
It was splendidly played all the same, as was Beethoven’s Ghost Trio, in a performance combining precision with great musicality. International in spirit as well as name, the group followed English and German music with Russian: Arensky’s First Piano Trio, a highly attractive late-Romantic piece, rich in melody and well-written for the combination, which we should hear more often. Once again their performance was one fine detail, spirit and cogency.

Solo
Waterloo Courier, Waterloo, Iowa
But the premier performance was that of Concertmaster Vasile Beluska. The solo violin part, which likely represents the Princess herself, is hauntingly beautiful and recurs in all four movements. Beluska played it with flawless grace. His sweet and delicate tone and accuracy of pitch, particularly on the difficult pianissimo high notes, deserve the highest praise.

Bowling Green String Quartet
Toledo Blade, Toledo, Ohio
Haydn’s Quartet in F Major Opus 77, No. 2, was the last of his many quartets and showed many characteristics of Schubert and the Romantic Period. The opening movement was joyful and was played with excitement and confidence. The quartet played with precise articulation and the beautiful nuances and superb technique were truly professional.

Piano Trio
The Des Moines Register, Des Moines, Iowa
What Tchaikovsky could do to bring out the full gamut of expressive content inherent in a string instrument is unique. Beluska’s violin and Reuss’s cello, sometimes singly and often in unison, sang out with rich, full sound, communicating beautifully with each other and endowing the whole with deep sentiment that never degenerated into sentimentality.

String Quartet
The Peninsula Times Tribune, San Francisco, California
The Haydn Quartet opened the concert on a cheerful note. This mature work has more body and soul than his earlier quartets which fall more into the “pleasantly entertaining” category. The performers explored its various harmonic and melodic avenues and embued it with an ebullience which added a feeling of youthful vivacity.

Trio Performing at Inauguration, January 2003

Piano Quartet
The Peninsula Times Tribune, San Francisco, California
Machiko Koblalka was more evenly matched with three strings (Beluska, Carter and Goldblatt) in the Mozart quartet. The Rondo benefited from her lively energy and Beluska was distinguished in the lovely Andante.

Piano Trio
The Peninsula Times Tribune, San Francisco, California
Beethoven’s Trio op.70 No. 1, the “Ghost”, was marvelously performed by the International Trio composed of violinist Vasile Beluska, cellist Stefan Reuss and pianist Howard Aibel. The “Ghost” gets its name from the brooding slow movement, which is, of the three movements, the most characteristic of the middle period of the composer’s output. The difficult unison passages in the final movement were handled deftly and with perfect intonation.

Piano Trio
The London Times
The International Trio enterprisingly arrived with a long-forgotten piano trio in D by Capriani Potter, now echoing early Beethoven, now pre-echoing Mendelssohn. Though the resonance of St. James’s Piccadilly inevitably resulted in keyboard domination and some loss of detail, the players themselves were always alert to balance as well as nimble in repartee.

Piano Trio
Peter Hamlin, KHKE Radio
The International Trio continues to demonstrate a striking musical resonance among its members. The music breathes as a single organism, and yet, where appropriate, each performer can exert a strong individual personality. Vasile Beluska exhibits a lovely mellow violin sound, a pleasure to hear in conjunction with his flawless intonation and smooth attack.

Bowling Green String Quartet
The Excelsior – Mexico City
In this concert at The Sala Chopin and enthusiastic audience enjoyed a concert of authentic quality.
Their program began with the Quartet Op. 77 in F Majoy by Haydn, the last work written by the Viennese composer since the following opus 103 is only a fragment. An extraordinary work to which the Bowling Green Quartet gave an interpretation that was correct in its classicism and plasticity and diversified in each one of the entrances of the instruments.

Beethoven Triple Concerto
Waterloo Courier, Waterloo, Iowa
The Beethoven Concerto is, in several ways, an ideal vehicle to show off the talents of the three performers. For each is a virtuoso artist in his own right. (Two of them - Aibel and Beluska – have already performed as soloists with the orchestra). The Concerto gives each player a turn at solo passages and each of the trio played splendidly.